Note

This is the old WDFH Westchester Public Radio site, which stopped being updated when WDFH went off the air in the summer of 2013. 

WDFH is now  MEDIA FOR THE PUBLIC GOOD (MFPG).  Please visit the new MFPG site for current information.

Pacifica Radio Network

LISTEN

Live webcast

More webcast options

ARCHIVES

PODCASTS

 

SUPPORT WDFH

Make a tax-deductible contribution

Get exposure for your business or nonprofit

Our foundation & business supporters

 

PROGRAMMING

Live music from WDFH

Weekly news and public affairs program listings

Schedule

Overview

 

JOIN US

Volunteers

Interns

SITE Contents

Home

About WDFH

Community organizations

Contact

Commentary

FM coverage map

Site index

 

LGBTQ youth issues:


OutCasting

 

Local news:

In Focus

Eyes on Westchester

 

Nonprofits:

For the Greater Good

 

Health:

Recovery Talk

 

National/world news:

fsrn.gif (9950 bytes)

LGBTQ issues:

Media critique:

Documentaries:

Making Contact

Sprouts

 

Long-form discussions and lectures:

 

Contents of entire site copyright 2013 WDFH-FM

 

WDFH FM 90.3
Westchester Public Radio
serving NY's lower Hudson valley

Listen now
Make tax deductible donation

Broadcast deregulation

 

THE PUBLIC INTEREST, CONVENIENCE, OR NECESSITY: A DEAD STANDARD IN THE ERA OF BROADCAST DEREGULATION?

PACE LAW REVIEW

Vol. 10 No. 3 Page 661

Citation: 10 Pace L. Rev. 661 (1990)

 

Pace University School of Law

Summer, 1990

 by Marc Sophos

Copyright 1990 by the Pace Law Review; Marc Sophos

This is a lengthy work on the subject of broadcast deregulation, its excesses, and its effects.  Although it was published in 1990, its relevance is even greater today than it was then: almost every week, one can read about new mega-mergers that create vast media conglomerates, resulting in an alarming degree of ownership concentration in the electronic mass media.

The article is available in pdf format.  You must have the free Adobe Reader software to open it.  Alternatively, you can read it in plain text.  The links are below.

To get a general sense of what the piece is about, expand the bookmarks in the document and read the Introduction and Conclusion first.

Comments from prominent individuals about this article:

Mario Cuomo, Governor of New York (11/7/90):

You point out well the great lengths to which Reagan Administration regulators have often gone to carry out their laissez-faire ideology, and the analytic contortions they have performed to get there.  To our great cost, the scandals over the savings and loan bailout and the Federal nuclear weapons plant cleanups remind us that reasonable regulation serves essential social purposes.  It protects society from the tremendous damage to our human, fiscal and environmental health that laissez-faire would otherwise impose on us.

Your work is a useful part of the antidote we need to the deregulatory excesses of the 1980s.

Ervin S. Duggan, FCC Commissioner (10/29/90):

Unfortunately, so much has happened to erode the public interest standard that its future is uncertain.  I intend, however, to do what I can to rehabilitate that standard in a form that makes sense in an environment of "light-handed" regulation.  As I contemplate how to do that, your article will be most helpful for its historical content and its strong statement of the rationale for the public-interest standard.